Charity door-to-door callers should be more charitable

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On August 2, whilst I was out, my husband opened the door to a young man who was charity door knocking on behalf of the British Heart Foundation.

As we already give and work for several charities of our choice, we do not like or welcome such blatant harassment and some might call intimidation, especially when knocking at the doors of more vulnerable/naive people, who will feel compelled/or made to give.

My husband did explain all this to him, yet despite this, he had the cheek to come back to our house several hours later to ask again!

Being fully involved with my chosen charities, I /we are very aware that everyone is scratching around for money. But, if charities want people to give to them, then they should stop this form of getting money, as for us, and I am sure many others it makes you anti-charity giving.

This also goes for those who collect in pubs, not realising that some people can only afford to go the pub with just the right amount of money for their drinks, then when approached, in front of others, they are made to feel guilty or under pressure, and feel compelled to part with what little money they may have.

So, all charities please note, if you want us, the general public to support and give to you, or if you are involved in this type of approaching, please stop. Perhaps you should reconsider where you are going wrong if not enough money is coming back to you.

In my experience, most charities do not listen enough to their clients/members, or have become staid and stuck in a previous century mentality with too many trustees and those in charge wanting to keep things as they have always been in not realising that such old fashioned ideas and concepts are not working, and totally out of date.

I think it would be a good idea if all charities should now be run more as caring businesses, with their clients/members all becoming share holders, paying a moderate amount each year for their membership.

This will then help with funds and allow clients/members more say in how we are served.

I am interested to know what other Observer readers may think of this, especially those involved in charities and charitable works.

C.Ward

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