These 5 car air-con hacks will cool you down faster in the heatwave

These 5 car air-con hacks will cool you down faster in the heatwave
These 5 car air-con hacks will cool you down faster in the heatwave

We’ve had record sunny weather this last few weeks in the UK. If you’ve been feeling hot and bothered while driving, try these simple air conditioning hacks, from car maker SEAT, to get the most out of your car A/C unit.

Don’t turn the air conditioning on full blast as soon as you get in the car

When entering a hot car, it’s tempting to turn the air-con on to maximum. However, turning on the air conditioning straight away without opening the windows will just recirculate the hot air. Instead, open the doors, lower the windows for a minute or two before shutting the doors and cranking up the A/C.

Don’t leave the air recirculation option activated

Don’t leave the auto recirculation activated.

Keeping it on can make the windows fog and reduce visibility. Most cars will have an ‘Auto’ option, which can regulate itself to prevent fog while keeping drivers and passengers cool.

Turn it on in the morning before things heat up

Some summer mornings can be cool, but it’s still a good idea to keep the A/C on to prevent windows from fogging up when the outside temperature rises.

Point the jets up, not toward you

Point the A/C jets up, not toward you

It’s tempting, but it’s counter-productive and stops the car getting an even distribution of airflow. Pointing the jets upward lets the cool air spread around the car more effectively and allows it to reach all occupants.

Perform regular maintenance

Just like the oil, tyres or brake fluid, the air conditioning system requires maintenance. Failing to change clogged cabin air filters every 10,000 to 15,000 miles can stop your A/C working effectively.

According to SEAT, driving in a hot car can make you more than just uncomfortable – it could actually put you and your passengers at risk.

A difference of just 10°C – 35°C compared to 25°C – inside the cabin can diminish reaction times by 20% – the equivalent to a blood alcohol reading of 0.05%; matching the Scottish limit and close to the maximum of 0.08% for the rest of the UK.

With outside temperatures recently soaring above 30°C in the UK, hurried commuters and holiday-makers in particular could also be at risk of dehydration.

Ángel Suárez, an engineer at the SEAT Technical Centre, says: “Open the doors and lower the windows for a minute before turning on the air conditioning to naturally lower the temperature in the interior.”

If rear passengers say they can’t feel the cool air, then the nozzles could be set incorrectly. “It isn’t a matter of temperature, but in which direction the air is flowing inside the car,” says Suárez. “The nozzles should be pointing upwards, not towards peoples’ faces. Then the air flows all around the interior of the car and reaches every passenger consistently.”

 

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