Planning appeal on Burwash development dropped

B:SoFFC campaigners SUS-181122-091330001
B:SoFFC campaigners SUS-181122-091330001

Developers have withdrawn their appeal against Rother District Council’s refusal to grant permission to build more than 40 new homes in a village.

Last year Denton Homes applied to the authority to build 42 new houses on land north west of Shrub Lane in Burwash.

The proposal was recommended for approval by the council’s planning officers but councillors sitting on the authority’s planning committee refused permission in October 2017.

The Surrey-based property developers then appealed, but withdrew this week.

Read more: Burwash housing development proposal rejected.

Campaigners who objected to the plans said the site forms part of the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and is adjacent to ancient woodland.

Councillor Eleanor Kirby-Green said: “This is wonderful news. This planning application should never have been recommended for approval by officers. In doing so it went against many of our own policies. Credit must go to members of the planning committee who voted against the proposal. New housing is required in Rother but it must be appropriate and in the right place. This development would not have delivered what locals need and would have caused irreparable damage to the High Weald AONB.”

Many other reasons for refusal were set out in petitions made by Burwash: Save our Fields from Concrete (B:SoFFC), Burwash and Etchingham Parish Councils. Objectors said the proposals would have adversely impacted on traffic in Shrub Lane and congestion at the A265 junction and High Street and damaged the flora and fauna in the area.

Robert Banks, of B:SoFFC, said: “The group has fought five planning applications and appeals and has won all five. Burwash needs the right homes in the right place.”

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